Tax Relief Services

Please note that we provide a multitude or services to accommodate just about any tax situation. Please take a look at the information below. If there’s a uniqueness to your situation that’s not covered below, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Tax Liens
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A tax lien is the government’s way to secure its interest in your assets and facilitate collection of your tax liability. After a lien is properly filed, the government has a right to all of your property, as well as any property or rights to property you acquire thereafter. Once its interest in your property is secured, the government can levy or seize your property as a means of collection. In addition to the prospect of a levy or seizure, taxpayers will often witness a significant decline in their credit score and an increase in difficulty obtaining a loan or line of credit.

Although tax liabilities and tax liens often go hand-in-hand, we will help you determine if a lien has been filed, and if not, we will explain what you need to do to prevent a lien filing. In certain circumstances, the government will allow a payment arrangement or a settlement without the need for a lien filing. In situations where a lien has already been filed, relief may be granted via a request for a lien discharge or a subordination of the lien under certain conditions. In all cases regarding liens, we will ensure your taxpayer rights are protected and, if necessary, file an appeal on

Audits
A recent trend of the IRS has shown that correspondence and in-person audits are on the rise, especially among higher income earners. Some common causes for a tax return to be selected for an audit are random selection, computer screening where a mathematical reconciliation error has occurred, document matching reasons, unusual or excessive use of deductions, recent tax returns filed in bulk, or a related audit or collection case being worked by the IRS, among others.

In you have received a letter or phone call from the IRS requesting an audit, it is imperative that you seek professional representation in a timely manner. As our client, we will review the audit process with you and ensure your rights are being protected throughout the audit. We can arrange to accompany you to the audit and will guide you through the audit process and present your options to you throughout every stage. In the event you disagree with the audit results, we will explain your appeal rights and how to petition the Tax Court.

Appeals
Publication 1 Your Rights as a Taxpayer is one of the most important documents the IRS is required to provide you. The publication outlines your rights as a taxpayer when faced with an IRS collection or audit situation, and explains such rights related to privacy, representation, and appeals and judicial review, among many others. An IRS appeal can take the form of a discussion with an IRS employee’s manager, a formal review by the IRS Appeals Office, a judicial review by the U.S. Tax Court, or all three.

Even more important than knowing your various appeal rights knows when to use them. In most cases, IRS actions can be appealed before and after such actions have taken place, but within certain timeframes. While working your case, we will ensure your appeal rights are preserved and exercised at the right times. The timeliness and type of appeal request are crucial elements for an effective appeal. If an administrative appeal proves ineffective, we will guide you through the judicial appeal process.

IRS Offer in Compromise
Our tax attorneys and licensed experts have extensive expertise with planning, preparing, and negotiating Offers in Compromise (OIC). If you qualify, an Offer in Compromise is frequently the ideal solution for resolving your delinquent tax liability. In the last published IRS statistics, the IRS reports that the average discount on accepted Offers was 88% (only 12 cents on the dollar was paid by Americans with accepted OICs), and that the average acceptance rate was around 24%. Given the savings possibilities on accepted OICs, the experienced team of Tax Attorneys and licensed experts at Freedom specializes in the Offer in Compromise program and works very hard to see if our clients qualify for an OIC. Call us today to see if you qualify.

The OIC is still a relatively new IRS instrument created in 1992 by Section 7122 of the Tax Code. The two primary grounds under which an OIC can be successfully negotiated with the IRS are: “doubt as to collectability” (e.g. the taxpayer is unable to pay the full burden), or “doubt as to liability” (e.g. the taxpayer contends that they owe the debt). There is a more recent third ground for acceptance, “effective tax administration” (e.g. the IRS wants to get as much as they can, and they may potentially think that 12 cents on the dollar is as good as they can do on a taxpayer). For an Offer in Compromise to be accepted, however, the taxpayer has the burden of proof that they either have no possible means of paying the tax or that they do not actually owe the tax.

The primary determinant on “doubt as to collectability” is based on a taxpayer’s personal financial profile; including income, expenses, and assets. The IRS sets strict guidelines for income, allowable expenses (categorized as: Living, Housing, Transport), and available equity in owned assets. An additional benefit of submitting an OIC is that IRS Restructuring Act prohibits the IRS from collecting a tax liability by levy during the period in which the Offer is being processed, or 30 days following rejection of an offer, or during the appeal of an OIC. This window of non-collection is frequently a respite for our clients to avoid any IRS collection actions, thereby securing additional time for clients to pay and prevents the IRS from seizing any assets in the interim.

If accepted, payment terms for an Offer in Compromise can be in one of two methods: cash (typically 20% with submission of offer and 80% within 90 days of acceptance), OR short-term deferred payment (24 monthly payments starting with submission of offer).

Call us if you have any questions about the IRS guidelines or the process for preparing, submitting, and negotiating an Offer in Compromise at 1-877-433-4161

IRS Installment Agreement
Our tax attorneys and licensed experts have extensive expertise with planning, preparing, and negotiating Offers in Compromise (OIC). If you qualify, an Offer in Compromise is frequently the ideal solution for resolving your delinquent tax liability. In the last published IRS statistics, the IRS reports that the average discount on accepted Offers was 88% (only 12 cents on the dollar was paid by Americans with accepted OICs), and that the average acceptance rate was around 24%. Given the savings possibilities on accepted OICs, the experienced team of Tax Attorneys and licensed experts at Freedom specializes in the Offer in Compromise program and works very hard to see if our clients qualify for an OIC. Call us today to see if you qualify.

The OIC is still a relatively new IRS instrument created in 1992 by Section 7122 of the Tax Code. The two primary grounds under which an OIC can be successfully negotiated with the IRS are: “doubt as to collectability” (e.g. the taxpayer is unable to pay the full burden), or “doubt as to liability” (e.g. the taxpayer contends that they owe the debt). There is a more recent third ground for acceptance, “effective tax administration” (e.g. the IRS wants to get as much as they can, and they may potentially think that 12 cents on the dollar is as good as they can do on a taxpayer). For an Offer in Compromise to be accepted, however, the taxpayer has the burden of proof that they either have no possible means of paying the tax or that they do not actually owe the tax.

The primary determinant on “doubt as to collectability” is based on a taxpayer’s personal financial profile; including income, expenses, and assets. The IRS sets strict guidelines for income, allowable expenses (categorized as: Living, Housing, Transport), and available equity in owned assets. An additional benefit of submitting an OIC is that IRS Restructuring Act prohibits the IRS from collecting a tax liability by levy during the period in which the Offer is being processed, or 30 days following rejection of an offer, or during the appeal of an OIC. This window of non-collection is frequently a respite for our clients to avoid any IRS collection actions, thereby securing additional time for clients to pay and prevents the IRS from seizing any assets in the interim.

If accepted, payment terms for an Offer in Compromise can be in one of two methods: cash (typically 20% with submission of offer and 80% within 90 days of acceptance), OR short-term deferred payment (24 monthly payments starting with submission of offer).

Call us if you have any questions about the IRS guidelines or the process for preparing, submitting, and negotiating an Offer in Compromise at 1-877-433-4161.

Filing Late IRS Tax Returns
A frequent response from taxpayers who cannot afford the potential tax liability that will be created by submitting their tax returns is to become non-filers (stop filing, since they cannot afford the payments anyway). Our Supervising Tax Attorney believes that it is almost always in the best interest of the consumer to file, regardless of ability to pay. While the potential for criminal prosecution for failing to file a tax return is very small, the economic consequences are severe – there is a maximum 25% late filing penalty that can be applied to the tax. Combined with accruing interest, this late filing penalty can add up to almost 50% of the original liability in many cases.

Many of our clients have not filed properly for a year, some for over a decade. Our Tax Specialists will work with you to prepare and file historic returns, even if you no longer have the original records from the filing years.

If you need assistance filing late tax returns, contact us to review your options: 1-877-433-4161.

IRS Payroll Tax Debt
Employers are required to withhold employment taxes from their employees’ payroll and pay over to the IRS this owed “Trust Fund Tax.” When small business owners are unable to meet the IRS obligations, a Trust Fund Tax liability is created. The IRS is aggressive in enforcement of Trust Fund Taxes, and does not allow Trust Fund Tax to be discharged in a bankruptcy, no matter how old the tax liability is. This means that if you owe delinquent Payroll Tax, you must address the liability and find a solution. Given the complicated nature of Payroll Tax/Trust Fund Tax, call our supervising Tax Attorney to discuss your options and find the best course of action to resolve the tax liability.

The IRS reports that approximately 2 million businesses owe almost $50 billion in Payroll Tax. The IRS is increasing its enforcement actions, so the probability of facing a lien, levy or other action may be increasing. To determine if you may have a Trust Fund Tax Liability, there are two primary determinant tests: whether you are “responsible” for collecting or paying withheld income and employment taxes, or for paying collected excise taxes; and (2) whether you “willfully failed” to collect or perform your obligations.

Typically, the IRS has the right to take enforcement action against anyone who meets these determinant tests, even if they were not an officer or employee of the corporation which originally collected the payroll taxes.

If you need assistance with IRS payroll tax issues, contact us immediately to see if you qualify for relief: 1-877-433-4161.

IRS Tax Penalties
Abatement, or adjustment, of a tax liability means to reduce or change a tax, penalty, or interest. Most frequently, abatement refers to eliminating an assessed tax liability and adjustment references reducing or altering an assessed tax liability. If there is a reasonable cause for abatement or adjustment, the IRS may be willing to review the penalties which created a tax liability.

The IRS takes the position that a penalty should not be asserted if the taxpayer’s liability is as a result of reasonable cause, and not “willful neglect.” Some frequent definitions of reasonable cause include: death or illness in the taxpayer’s immediate family, unavoidable absence, destruction by natural causes of the taxpayer’s residence, the taxpayer cannot reasonably obtain the records for liability determination, the non-filing was due to IRS error, failure by the US Post Office, failure by a competent tax advisor, civil disturbance, and others. Most frequently, the burden of proof resides with the taxpayer to prove reasonable cause.

If you need assistance with IRS tax penalty issues, contact us immediately to see if you qualify for relief: 1-877-433-4161.

Innocent Spouse Relief
There are many basis for abating taxes and assessed tax penalties, including “Innocent Spouse” determination. Typically, adjustment/abatement is a means for reducing or deferring a liability which is used in conjunction with another tax relief method to resolve the taxes owed. There are three types of Innocent Spouse relief: traditional Innocent Spouse relief, separation of liability, and equitable relief. Traditional Innocent Spouse relief is granted to join-filers (typically married couples) when one spouse was unaware of the erroneous item which created a tax liability; Separation of liability is primarily for join-filers who are currently separated, and equitable relief is for a spouse who should not be held liable and who fails to meet the two preceding determinations. In each Innocent Spouse determination, the non-electing spouse/partner will be notified and may participate in the proceedings.

In all of the Innocent Spouse adjustments, the IRS’ goal is to provide relief to the spouse who was unaware or not at fault for the creation of a tax liability; hence the IRS rules that it would be inequitable to hold the innocent spouse liable for any tax deficiencies.

If you think you have the potential to request Innocent Spouse relief, call our tax specialists for a free consultation at: 1-877-433-4161.

Currently Not Collectable (CNC)
If a taxpayer does not qualify for an offer in compromise and cannot afford to pay an Installment Agreement, Currently not Collectible (CNC) status may be an option. If a client is placed in CNC status, the statute of limitations continues to run and the IRS will not pursue collection actions. However, if a taxpayer’s financial status improves, the IRS can remove the file from CNC status and return to active collection status.

  1. Taxpayer has income below allowable expenses and there is no indication that the financial situation will improve in the future;
  2. Due to high equity, the taxpayer does not qualify for an OIC and has more allowable expenses than income so an Installment Agreement is not an option; and,
  3. Taxpayer has more allowable expenses than income and the statute of limitations is getting close to expiring.

If you would like to learn more about CNC status, contact us at: 1-877-433-4161

State Tax Settlements
Entering into a settlement with the IRS does not automatically settle your State tax issues. Dealing with the State can often be more difficult and frustrating than dealing with the IRS. The State agents are not bound by the same rules and guidelines as those in the IRS. Our tax attorneys at Superior Tax Resolutions Services have represented clients in State tax issues from across the country.

We have the experience in dealing with aggressive State agents and have gotten results for our clients. Our State tax settlements include:

  1. Reduce or eliminate unfair penalties
  2. Remove liens
  3. Stop levies or garnishments
  4. Payment plans

Call now and talk to one of our tax experts. As always, your initial consultation is free!

Business Reorganization
Sometimes a fresh start is needed for a business to get rejuvenated and out from underneath tax debt. In some cases, business reorganization can substantially reduce your IRS tax debt and give your company a clean slate for the future. As a business owner, this strategy can help you walk away from those sky-high IRS penalties and interest.

The tax attorneys at Superior Tax Resolutions Services will evaluate your situation to determine if reorganizing your business will benefit you and help to reduce your company’s IRS tax debt. Reorganizing a business to reduce tax debt involves complex legal matters. If it’s not done right, your company could be in a worse position than before.

At Superior Tax Resolutions Services our tax attorneys have extensive knowledge in dealing with complicated tax cases. Our tax professionals have the legal training to successfully manage business reorganization within the IRS rules and regulations. Superior Tax Resolutions Services has developed proven strategies to effectively reduce tax debt through reorganizing your company.

Call Superior Tax Resolutions Services today for a free consultation. You could get IRS debt help and a new beginning for your business may be right around the corner.

Business State Tax Issues & Resolutions
States have less regulation when it comes to their enforcement and will generally be more aggressive in their collection efforts. State and County sales and use tax is one of the most complicated areas for a business owner, with multiple taxes applying to one transaction. The number of State audits has increased over the past few years with States becoming extremely diligent in their enforcement. State liens, levies and garnishments can often come much quicker than the IRS.

Many States will shut down businesses with past due sales tax. The tax attorneys at Superior Tax Resolutions Services have experience in representing businesses from all over the country.

Don’t delay. Call now and put our training to work and get back to running your business. As always, your initial consultation is free!